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AM: [Fwd: FW: Gorilla Marketing]

To:     ad-market@netpreneur.org
Subject:     AM: [Fwd: FW: Gorilla Marketing]
From:     Dan Nickell <dnickell@pop.erols.com>
Date:     Tue, 05 Aug 1997 00:41:02 -0400
Organization:     NET, Inc.
Reply-To:     dnickell@pop.erols.com

Mitch asked me to post this exchange to the forum.

Dan Nickell writes:  

Mr. Atkinson:

Mitch Arnowitz forwarded a memo you wrote on Gorilla Marketing and,
since you had included a request for some feedback, I thought I would
share what thoughts I had with you.

There is a writer, Jay Levinson, who has made a good living the last few
years by writing books titled and on the subject of "Guerilla
Marketing."  His perspective and mission is to provide marketing tools
to small companies operating on a shoestring marketing budget.  His
metaphor is that of the jungle warrior living off the land and using
native materials to wage effective warfare.  It's a good and useful
metaphor.

You have posed an interesting alternative to the use of the term.  While
retaining the basic jungle metaphor, you have used the term to refer to
a process of using the halo effect of a strategic alliance.  From my
perspective as a professional marketing consultant, I think it's a great
idea.  It is certainly a good way to get quick and credible publicity
and brand name recognition.  

As you grow, however, you will need to be careful that these
relationships and your association with them don't begin to restrict
your mobility and individuality.  That is, at some point you will have
to decide whether you are content continuing to be Trade Compass, that
GTE support group, or TRADE COMPASS, the globally unique source for....

Either strategy can be quite profitable.  My former father-in-law was
the head of a small tool and die shop that did nothing else except make
manifold prototypes for General Motors.  Made a fortune and had no
marketing or sales force to speak of.  Microsoft, on the other hand,
realizes considerable profitability by virtue of its sheer weight in the
market.  Your approach suggests, however, that at some time you will
have to make a decision whether to stick around or spin off.  Timing, I
think, will be the secret.

Good luck and best wishes.


Dan Nickell
http://www.netinc-usa.com

-- BEGIN included message

To:     "'dnickell@pop.erols.com'" <dnickell@pop.erols.com>
Subject:     FW: Gorilla Marketing
From:     Mitch Arnowitz <marnowitz@morino.org>
Date:     Mon, 4 Aug 1997 09:10:01 -0400
Cc:     "'gatkinson@tradecompass.com'" <gatkinson@tradecompass.com>, "'mitch'" <marnowitz@morino.org>
Dan-

Thanks for your comments on George's post. If George has no
objections, would you mind reposting this post directly to the 
discussion group at ad-market@netpreneur.org? I'de appreciate 
it much as I'm trying to drive relevant traffic to the local advertising/
marketing discussion group here in Washington. 

Dan, thanks-

Mitch



Dan Nickell writes:  

Mr. Atkinson:

Mitch Arnowitz forwarded a memo you wrote on Gorilla Marketing and,
since you had included a request for some feedback, I thought I would
share what thoughts I had with you.

There is a writer, Jay Levinson, who has made a good living the last few
years by writing books titled and on the subject of "Guerilla
Marketing."  His perspective and mission is to provide marketing tools
to small companies operating on a shoestring marketing budget.  His
metaphor is that of the jungle warrior living off the land and using
native materials to wage effective warfare.  It's a good and useful
metaphor.

You have posed an interesting alternative to the use of the term.  While
retaining the basic jungle metaphor, you have used the term to refer to
a process of using the halo effect of a strategic alliance.  From my
perspective as a professional marketing consultant, I think it's a great
idea.  It is certainly a good way to get quick and credible publicity
and brand name recognition.  

As you grow, however, you will need to be careful that these
relationships and your association with them don't begin to restrict
your mobility and individuality.  That is, at some point you will have
to decide whether you are content continuing to be Trade Compass, that
GTE support group, or TRADE COMPASS, the globally unique source for....

Either strategy can be quite profitable.  My former father-in-law was
the head of a small tool and die shop that did nothing else except make
manifold prototypes for General Motors.  Made a fortune and had no
marketing or sales force to speak of.  Microsoft, on the other hand,
realizes considerable profitability by virtue of its sheer weight in the
market.  Your approach suggests, however, that at some time you will
have to make a decision whether to stick around or spin off.  Timing, I
think, will be the secret.

Good luck and best wishes.


Dan Nickell
http://www.netinc-usa.com



-- END included message

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