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Re: AM: Email list content dilemma

To:     ad-market@netpreneur.org
Subject:     Re: AM: Email list content dilemma
From:     Brian Alpert <balpert@telogy.com>
Date:     Fri, 20 Mar 1998 15:23:34 -0500
References:     <3512935B.9351F112@telogy.com> <3512B7D6.42BA01A7@netinc-usa.com>

Dan (et al) --

You make a really good point. In fact, it gives me an idea -- perhaps I
could lead with a brief summary that tells both engineers and
marketing-types:

-what technical stuff is overviewed
-there is a section overviewing what that means "in english"
-there is a section overviewing what it means in terms of
 (relevant) company's products, advances, etc.

That way, all parties know "what's in it for them" to read this
newsletter,  won't be off-put by the other guys stuff, and know they can
glance at the other guy's stuff if they're so inclined.  Hmm...

--BA

Daniel B. Nickell wrote:

> First, my impression is that your list reflects the makeup of Internet
> users in general and, consequently, the decision-making managers (vs.
> the more technically oriented engineers) are under-represented on the
> 'Net.
>
> Second, one might think that, in the context of enlightened
> self-interest, managers/decision-makers would want to keep abreast of
> new technical developments and new products that would make them more
> productive and successful.  Unfortunately, a lot of these
> decision-makers often insulate themselves from new information to keep
> from a real or an imagined deluge of junk mail from innovators.
>
> You *do* have a dilemma.  The only way around it, as I see it, in your
> communications with decision-makers, is to appeal to their sense of
> enlightened self-interest and to show them how membership on your list
> is going to improve their profitability and not junk up their mailbox
> with detail they don't need or want.
>
> Dan Nickell
> NET, Inc.
>
> Brian Alpert wrote:
>
> > All --
> >
> > I'm on the verge of launching an email list to further my
> > company's marketing goals (Telogy Networks, Inc.), and
> > wanted to toss out a few ideas for feedback/discussion.
> > Up front, I very much appreciate any time taken; I know
> > how busy everyone is.
> >
> > Telogy is an 'embedded software' company. It is esoteric,
> > Voice over IP-related stuff, sold to manufacturers
> > of network gear. Our products have gotten good coverage and
> > our customer list likewise has good names attached.
> >
> > The email list is permission-based, and will start small.
> > I'm estimating about 100 names.
> >
> > The list's goals are:
> > - to help establish Telogy as a leader
> > - increased visibility of the company/product name
> > - promote useful feedback from participants
> > - get leads/promote sales
> >
> > Our sales prospects are product/equipment managers:
> > Sr. Mgrs. and up. The ultimate demographic for our
> > list is healthy portions of those folks and the engineers
> > that design these wonderful boxes.
> >
> > The engineers are the ones who make technology recommendations
> > to mgt., so they're related to the sale.
> >
> > Situation: most of those who've registered for the list are
> > engineers. They are certainly welcome, but we haven't so far
> > attracted half of our true prospects, the half that makes
> > buying decisions.
> >
> > The groups have different content needs. The engineers are
> > interested in technical product info, release notes, schedules,
> > etc.
> >
> > The managers are more concerned with business market issues:
> > time to market, "build-in-house" vs. "buy-from-vendors,"
> > their own product strengths/weaknesses.
> >
> > My quandary: I want to keep the engineers interested, but
> > also want to attract the managers. If it is all marketing/business
> > the engineers will leave in a swarm. If it is all-tech,
> > the managers won't care.
> >
> > However, I think it is true that issues applying to one group
> > are relevant to the other, would like to capitalize on that,
> > and also would like to avoid maintaining multiple lists.
> >
> > Given the limited attention these tools get, do you think it
> > is viable to attempt to serve-up a content mix that appeals
> > to both audiences?
> >
> > Do you see risks in trying that? One that comes to mind
> > is, if the list is perceived to lack focus or a coherent
> > identity it may not be interesting to anyone.
> >
> > What specific content-related steps might I take to avoid
> > that?
> >
> > Do you have general content-related recommendations for
> > starting such a list?
> >
> > In advance, thanks again--
> >
> > --Brian Alpert
> > Manager Internet Marketing
> > Telogy Networks, Inc.
> > <http://www.telogy.com>
> > <http://embeddedsoftware.com>




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